chvrizard:

unclefather:

this is the wrong color tricycle mom I hate you so much this is the worst birthday ever

Every time I see this picture it has a different caption and they just keep getting better and better

chvrizard:

unclefather:

this is the wrong color tricycle mom I hate you so much this is the worst birthday ever

Every time I see this picture it has a different caption and they just keep getting better and better


Men, I would like to give this opportunity to extend your formal invitation. Gender equality is your issue, too. To date, I’ve seen my father’s role as a parent being valued less by society. I’ve seen young men suffering from illness, unable to ask for help for fear it will make them less of a man. I’ve seen men fragile and insecure by what constitutes male success. Men don’t have the benefits of equality, either. We don’t want to talk about men being imprisoned by gender stereotypes but I can see that they are. When they are free, things will change for women as a natural consequence. If men don’t have to be aggressive, women won’t be compelled to be submissive. If men don’t need to control, women won’t have to be controlled. Both men and women should feel free to be strong. It is time that we all see gender as a spectrum instead of two sets of opposing ideals. We should stop defining each other by what we are not and start defining ourselves by who we are. We can all be freer and this is what HeForShe is about. It’s about freedom. I want men to take up this mantle so their daughters, sisters and mothers can be free from prejudice but also so their sons have permission to be vulnerable and human, too and in doing so, be a more true and complete version of themselves - Emma Watson for HeForShe UN campaign

Men, I would like to give this opportunity to extend your formal invitation. Gender equality is your issue, too. To date, I’ve seen my father’s role as a parent being valued less by society. I’ve seen young men suffering from illness, unable to ask for help for fear it will make them less of a man. I’ve seen men fragile and insecure by what constitutes male success. Men don’t have the benefits of equality, either. We don’t want to talk about men being imprisoned by gender stereotypes but I can see that they are. When they are free, things will change for women as a natural consequence. If men don’t have to be aggressive, women won’t be compelled to be submissive. If men don’t need to control, women won’t have to be controlled. Both men and women should feel free to be strong. It is time that we all see gender as a spectrum instead of two sets of opposing ideals. We should stop defining each other by what we are not and start defining ourselves by who we are. We can all be freer and this is what HeForShe is about. It’s about freedom. I want men to take up this mantle so their daughters, sisters and mothers can be free from prejudice but also so their sons have permission to be vulnerable and human, too and in doing so, be a more true and complete version of themselves - Emma Watson for HeForShe UN campaign

cassbones:

take-liberties:

gohelloflo:

This is a truly amazing story of twin sisters separated at birth who discovered each other at age 25 through social media (see Facebook message above in which Anais reached out to Samantha for the first time). One lives in London and the other in L.A. and the two have shared a close bond since meeting. They recently took a trip together to their birthplace, Seoul, Korea, and now they’re hoping to make a film together about their story. Check out their kickstarter campaign here. Story via buzzfeed.

"I DON’T WANT TO BE TOO LINDSAY LOHAN."

GUYS ONE IS FROM LONDON AND THE OTHER IS FROM CALIFORNIA I DON’T THINK YOU UNDERSTAND HOW PARENT TRAP THIS IS

"

These are forms of male aggression that only women see. But even when men are afforded a front seat to harassment, they don’t always have the correct vantage point for recognizing the subtlety of its operation. Four years before the murders, I was sitting in a bar in Washington, D.C. with a male friend. Another young woman was alone at the bar when an older man scooted next to her. He was aggressive, wasted, and sitting too close, but she smiled curtly at his ramblings and laughed softly at his jokes as she patiently downed her drink. ‘Why is she humoring him?’ my friend asked me. ‘You would never do that.’ I was too embarrassed to say: ‘Because he looks scary’ and ‘I do it all the time.’

Women who have experienced this can recognize that placating these men is a rational choice, a form of self-defense to protect against setting off an aggressor. But to male bystanders, it often looks like a warm welcome, and that helps to shift blame in the public eye from the harasser and onto his target, who’s failed to respond with the type of masculine bravado that men more easily recognize.

"

Why it’s so hard for men to see misogyny (via ethiopienne)

BOOOM.  Read this if you are a dude, please.

(via geekyjessica)

Yesssssss.

(via quothtehblackbirdnevermoar)

Its hard for men to understand why women dont get loud & angry because they havent spent their entire lives being reprimanded whenever they take up too much space. (via pluralfloral)

thatdudeemu:

empowered00:

A Brazilian man recently submitted a birth certificate that if verified would mean he is 126-years-old.
According to the document, Jose Aguinelo dos Santos, was born on July 7, 1888 to African slave parents.
Once verified he will be the oldest man on the planet.  

This is amazing also this is for white people who like to say slavery was “so long ago”

thatdudeemu:

empowered00:

A Brazilian man recently submitted a birth certificate that if verified would mean he is 126-years-old.

According to the document, Jose Aguinelo dos Santos, was born on July 7, 1888 to African slave parents.

Once verified he will be the oldest man on the planet.  

This is amazing also this is for white people who like to say slavery was “so long ago”

micdotcom:

Potent minimalist art sends a strong message about police and vigilante brutality in America

Journalist and artist Shirin Barghi has created a gripping, thought-provoking series of graphics that not only examines racial prejudice in today’s America, but also captures the sense of humanity that often gets lost in news coverage. Titled “Last Words,” the graphics illustrate the last recorded words by Brown and other young black people — Trayvon Martin, Oscar Grant and others — who have been killed by police in recent years.

Let us not forget their voices